Nashville Software School

Boot camp from Categories Nashville
3

The Nashville Software School is a total immersion vocational programming boot camp. The goal is to train people to be working software developers. “In 6 months, we can take people from a zero from a technical standpoint to qualified for an entry level developer position.  This school is giving people foundational pieces of knowledge that they would get in a computer science or software engineer program.  They also get trained in current technologies that are in demand in the Nashville area.”  The Nashville Software School is about finding people who want to learn how to code and who want to stay in Nashville.”

The focus of the first class that started in June and graduated at the end of November was proving that the model worked.  All of the instructors are working professionals who are current in technology. The first class graduated 14 people, 3 of them women. Nashville Software School just kicked-off  the second class on January 7th. This class started with 30 people, including 8 women. “A few of the folks will drop out. They either decide that programming isn’t for them or they may not be able to handle the rigorous schedule. But, I’m expecting to see most of these people graduate in 6 months.”

The first 3 months focus on the core front-end or client-side technologies used to develop modern websites and web applications. The curriculum is a carefully curated collection of online and video tutorials, classroom lecture and seminar-style discussion. There are lots of exercises for solo and pair programming as well as larger team projects. The second 3 months focus on core technologies used to develop the back-end, or server-side, of modern web and mobile applications.

Not every student is automatically admitted to the second half of the program, where the students dig deeper into the business logic and database on the back-end or server side of the application. They must reapply and those who are accepted are eligible for a $400 per week stipend, and hopefully start connecting with local employers.

“Our goal is to charge students no more than $1,000 out of pocket. The rest of our cost is reimbursed by our partner companies and is structured like a recruiter fee. We have had about 15 partner companies interview the graduates from November   The students negotiate a salary for themselves and then those companies pay 20% of the first year’s salary back to the school. Really, it’s a reimbursement for the cost of training.”

The Nashville Software School is a non-profit but it is designed to be a self-sustaining program. Students are not obligated to work for a partner, though if they end up finding a job with a non-partner company, they are asked to pay back the basic cost of their training.

The Nashville Software School has an impressive group of 3o+ mentors who work with the students. They work with them one on one, sit in the back of the classroom to answer questions as the students work on coding exercises and hold the students accountable on projects and on their overall learning experience.  They also showcase their expertise as guest speakers on numerous topics.

Press:

“Nashville Software School aims to bolster ranks for tech industry” (Nashville Business Insider)

Nashville Software School

General

TypeIn-class
FocusJavascript,
Ruby on Rails
Started in2012

Education

Length24 weeks
Class size20-30 people
Sessions per year2
Dedication per week45+ hours
Minimum skill levelBasic computer skills
Placement test
Coding challenge
??
Prep work before classes start??
InterviewYes

Finances

Total Cost

$1,000
Exclusive discount to Bootcamps.in visitors
Refund (if accepted job through program)N/A
Financing / ScholarshipYes
$400 stipend
Deposit$1,000
PaymentsN/A

Assistance

JobAssistance
HousingNo
Student VisaNo

Contact

Emailinfo@nashvillesoftwareschool.com
Phone #???
Address315 Tenth Avenue North
CityNashville, TN
CountryUSA

Review

Full review of this coding schoolClick here

Links:

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  • A Former Student

    I finished the bootcamp in December. Overall it was a great experience, and I can’t imagine where I’d be right now without it.

    The curriculum was fast-paced, and I definitely had to work to keep up. We started with HTML/CSS, then went through javascript, jQuery, a little bit of PHP/Wordpress, then we went on to Ruby and Rails, as well as covering associated technologies (git, command line, etc). It was a 6 month program, which is why we could start from scratch and work all the way to building a smallish app at the end. Given that I was in the first class, it was surprisingly well organised. I can only assume it’s getting better.

    The job assistance was pretty well done. We had a little job fair at the end of the class where ~14 different companies came and we interviewed with all the ones that piqued our interest. I was hired by none of them, and getting increasingly worried that I didn’t have what it took to get a junior dev position. I talked to some mentors and they assured me I was fine, and it was mostly just timing (we graduated at the end of the year, which I guess is super busy for most companies). I kept scheduling interviews with new companies in town though, most of which were set up through the school. Finally I received a few job offers and accepted a position, I start Monday! I’m crazy excited.

    These are all pretty specific to the bootcamp I attended though. The one thing that really surprised me was the amount of community involvement. We had local devs come in almost every day to give presentations or just hang out and help us with our coding questions.

    I tried the self-study thing for a bit, and it wasn’t very effective, for me at least. Learning to code involves learning a new way of thinking, which for me was very frustrating. Seeing my peers having an equally hard time gave me a lot of confidence. Especially because most of the code youre exposed to is the final product, and I never saw the problems and struggles that every dev experiences. Also, a problem I had was not knowing when I actually ‘knew’ a technology. During my self-study I exposed myself to HTML and CSS but didn’t think I really knew them. After going through web design portion and not really learning anything new, I realized I already knew enough to build a site. It just never looked good, because I suck at design.

    TLDR: I’m 100% happy I enrolled in the class. It was great for learning, networking, as well as job placement.

    • thank you for your review. How much does it cost to rent a room/studio near the school?

  • A Former Student

    I finished the bootcamp in December. Overall it was a great experience, and I can’t imagine where I’d be right now without it.

    The curriculum was fast-paced, and I definitely had to work to keep up. We started with HTML/CSS, then went through javascript, jQuery, a little bit of PHP/Wordpress, then we went on to Ruby and Rails, as well as covering associated technologies (git, command line, etc). It was a 6 month program, which is why we could start from scratch and work all the way to building a smallish app at the end. Given that I was in the first class, it was surprisingly well organised. I can only assume it’s getting better.

    The job assistance was pretty well done. We had a little job fair at the end of the class where ~14 different companies came and we interviewed with all the ones that piqued our interest. I was hired by none of them, and getting increasingly worried that I didn’t have what it took to get a junior dev position. I talked to some mentors and they assured me I was fine, and it was mostly just timing (we graduated at the end of the year, which I guess is super busy for most companies). I kept scheduling interviews with new companies in town though, most of which were set up through the school. Finally I received a few job offers and accepted a position, I start Monday! I’m crazy excited.

    These are all pretty specific to the bootcamp I attended though. The one thing that really surprised me was the amount of community involvement. We had local devs come in almost every day to give presentations or just hang out and help us with our coding questions.

    I tried the self-study thing for a bit, and it wasn’t very effective, for me at least. Learning to code involves learning a new way of thinking, which for me was very frustrating. Seeing my peers having an equally hard time gave me a lot of confidence. Especially because most of the code youre exposed to is the final product, and I never saw the problems and struggles that every dev experiences. Also, a problem I had was not knowing when I actually ‘knew’ a technology. During my self-study I exposed myself to HTML and CSS but didn’t think I really knew them. After going through web design portion and not really learning anything new, I realized I already knew enough to build a site. It just never looked good, because I suck at design.

    TLDR: I’m 100% happy I enrolled in the class. It was great for learning, networking, as well as job placement.